News

Jacqueline Bisset-Honorable guest of Golden Apricot

Back 29 June 2016 18:22
Jacqueline Bisset-Honorable guest of Golden Apricot

This year the festival will host the magnificent Jacqueline Bisset, the famous actress, who will be bestowed upon PARAJANOV'S THALER during the Closing Ceremony.

Three famous films, starring Bisset, will be presented to spectators.

 Winifred Jacqueline Fraser Bisset in Weybridge, Surrey, England, in 1944, the daughter of Arlette Alexander, a lawyer turned housewife, and Max Fraser Bisset, a general practitioner. Her mother was of French and English and her father was descent Scottish; Bisset's mother cycled from Paris and boarded a British troop transport to escape the Germans during World War II. Bisset grew up in Tilehurst, near Reading in Berkshire, in a 17th-century country cottage, where she now lives part of the year. Her mother taught her to speak French fluently, and she was educated at the Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle in London. She had taken ballet lessons as a child and began taking acting lessons and fashion modelling to pay for them. When Bisset was a teenager, her mother was diagnosed with disseminated sclerosis. Bisset's parents divorced in 1968, after 28 years of marriage. Her father died aged 71 in 1982. Her mother died in 1999.

First appearing uncredited as a prospective model in 1965's The Knack ... and How to Get It, Bisset made her official film debut the following year in Roman Polanski's Cul-de-sac (1966). In 1967, she appeared in the movie Two for the Road. Next, she participated in the James Bond satire, Casino Royale, as Miss Goodthighs. That same year, she played her first lead role in The Cape Town Affair.

Several of Bisset's movies are also French or Italian productions. In 1973, she appeared in François Truffaut's Day for Night, where she earned the respect of European critics and moviegoers as a serious actress. She co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni in Luigi Comencini's La donna della domenica in 1975.

Bisset gained mainstream recognition in 1968 when she replaced Mia Farrow for the role of Norma MacIver in The Detective, opposite Frank Sinatra. In the same year, she co-starred with Michael Sarrazin in The Sweet Ride, which brought her a Golden Globe nomination for Most Promising Newcomer, and played Steve McQueen's girlfriend in the police drama Bullitt, which was among the top five highest-grossing films of the year.

She was one of the many stars in the 1970 disaster film Airport, as a pregnant stewardess. Following films included The Mephisto Waltz (1971) with Alan Alda, The Thief Who Came to Dinner (1973) with Ryan O'Neal and End of the Game (1975) with Jon Voight.

Several of Bisset's movies are also French or Italian productions. In 1973, she appeared in François Truffaut's Day for Night, where she earned the respect of European critics and moviegoers as a serious actress. She co-starred with Marcello Mastroianni in Luigi Comencini's La donna della domenica in 1975.

In 1977, Bisset made strides towards becoming a better-known entertainer in America with her movie The Deep, where swimming underwater wearing only a T-shirt for a top, helped make the film a box office success, leading the producer Peter Guber to say, "That T-shirt made me a rich man." At the time, Newsweek declared her "the most beautiful film actress of all time."

By 1978, she was a household name. In that year she earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress (Comedy) for her performance in Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, and starred opposite Anthony Quinn in The Greek Tycoon. Soon thereafter, she played in the movies When Time Ran out (1980) with Paul Newman, and George Cukor's Rich and Famous (1981) with Candice Bergen, where she also served as co-producer. One of her well-known roles was in Class (1983), where she played Rob Lowe's attractive mother who has an affair with her son's prep school roommate. She earned another Golden Globe nomination for her role in John Huston's Under the Volcano (1984) opposite Albert Finney.

Bisset has appeared in many made-for-TV movies since the mid-1980s, starting with the cable adaptation of Anna Karenina with Christopher Reeve in 1985. One of her later TV movies, in 2003, was America's Prince: The John F. Kennedy Jr. Story, in which she portrayed Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. Bisset's other television work includes the Biblical epics Jesus (1999) and In the Beginning (2000), and the miniseries Joan of Arc, which earned her an Emmy nomination for Best Supporting Actress.

In 1996, Bisset was nominated for a César Award for her role in the French film La Cérémonie. She appeared in the 16th century period drama Dangerous Beauty (1998) as Catherine McCormack's mother, a retired Venetian courtesan, and had the leading role in the 2001 independent feature The Sleepy Time Gal, which premiered on the Sundance Channel and was cited by the Village Voice in its annual survey of the year's best undistributed films. In 2005, she was seen in the Domino Harvey biographical film Domino with Keira Knightley: She starred in the lead role of Boaz Yakin's Death in Love, which premiered at the 2008 Sundance FF.

In 2010, Bisset was awarded the Légion d'honneur insignia, with French President Nicolas Sarkozy calling her "a movie icon."

Bullitt, 

Peter Yates (United States)

Murder on the Orient Express, 

Sidney Lumet (United Kingdom)

Day for Night

, François Truffaut (France)

Moscow Cinema
 Hirair and Anna Hovnanian Foundation
 
Daily
 
Festival Coverage
 
 
©2004-2022 GOLDEN APRICOT INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Design